Berlin, New York 12022

 

 

 

A Monster in Berlin?


The Troy Daily Budget, in its Local Summary Column, printed the following on April 14, 1852:


"An Awful Monster.--We saw this morning the dead body of one of the most singular natural curiosities which we have ever beheld. It was what preported to be the carcass of a calf--resembling in its conformations to anything but a wolf. The head--which measured in circumference, just above the ears, 3 feet and 3 inches--have a striking and startling resemblance to the human head. From above the eyes to the back of the neck it presented itself a perfect resemblance to the head of an old man--the hair and locks being of the "silver gray" order--and the whole bearing an exact resemblance of what an old man's head would be were it enlarged into Brobdignagian (giant) proportions. The forehead was singularly perfect, giving a striking develpment of what the phrenologists (those who study the shape, etc. of the skull) call the "reflective faculties." The under jaw was similar to that of a hog--being furnished with tusks and other swinish appurtenances. The eyes were large and remarkable in appearance, with eyebrows somewhat resembling those of an old man. But the body was no less remarkable than the head. The monster was of no sex--and possessed the feet of a hog--the tail of a dog--and a body covered with hair like that of a grey-hound. Thus this remarkable curiosity has in combination some portions of the human, the hog, the cow and the dog species.


It is the property of Elisha Hull, of Berlin, who has brought it to this city to show it to those curious in such matters. It may be seen at Worden's Hotel, Congress Street.


Elisha Hull was born in 1795 in Westerly, Rhode Island, and died August 3, 1868. His parents were Thomas Hull and Amy Peckham. Elisha was a descendent of Daniel Hull who made the first Yankee settlement in Berlin in 1770. One can read more about the Hull family in "Reminiscences in the Settling of the Valley of the Little Hoosick" by Nelson Hull written in 1858.